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MERS CoV Cases 1-77 (April 2012 to June 2013)

by: AlohaOR

Sat Nov 24, 2012 at 23:46:33 PM EST


Last updated September 21, 2013.

The cases are listed in the order that they were reported, not necessarily in the order they occurred.

The diary of cases from July 2013 forward is here.

AlohaOR :: MERS CoV Cases 1-77 (April 2012 to June 2013)
Novel Coronavirus Cases Reported by WHO
# Location Age/
Gender
Symptom Onset Outcome Notes
1 Saudi Arabia 60M 13 Jun 2012 Died 24 Jun 2012 Died in Jeddah from severe pneumonia with renal failure (link)
2 Qatar 49M 3 Sep 2012 Died 3 Jul 2013 Traveled in Saudi Arabia; renal failure; family members were also symptomatic, but tested negative; was hospitalized in the UK (link)
3 Saudi Arabia 39M 28 Oct 2012 Died date n/r Family member of cases 4 & 7, renal failure (link)
4 Saudi Arabia 31M 3 Nov 2012 Recovering Family member of cases 3 & 7 (link)
5 Saudi Arabia 45M 9 Oct 2012 Recovered Patient had pre-existing conditions.  Three days before symptom onset, the man visited a farm near his home and had brief contact with farm animals. The man had not traveled outside Riyadh before his illness, but he had been in contact with one of his children, who had a mild cold. The patient fell ill on Oct 9, was seriously ill by Oct 12, and was moved to an intensive care unit (ICU) the next day; suffered renal failure. Discharged Nov 4 (link)
6 Qatar/Germany 45M 12 Oct 2012 Recovering Became sick in Qatar; flown to Germany for treatment; had renal failure (link)
7 Saudi Arabia 70M Oct 2012 Died date n/r Father of case #3, died of renal failure 4 days before his son was hospitalized
8 Jordan 25M 21 Mar 2012 Died 25 Apr 2012 University student, part of a cluster of severe pneumonia cases in healthcare workers in Zarqa; was treated for pericarditis; no travel history or contact with animals in 10 days prior to symptom onset (link)
9 Jordan 40F 2 Apr 2012 Died 19 Apr 2012 ICU nurse at the Zarqa hospital; no travel history or contact with animals in 10 days prior to symptom onset (link)
10 UK 60M 24 Jan 2013 Died Mar 19 Family member of cases #11 & 12; traveled from Pakistan to Saudi Arabia (link)
11 UK 38M Rep 13 Feb 2013 Died 18 Feb Son of case #10; family member of case #12; no recent travel history; had underlying medical condition (cancer)
12 UK F (age n/r) Rep Feb 2013 Recovered Family member of cases #10 & 11; mild case; no recent travel history
13 Saudi Arabia 61F Hosp 29 Jan 2013 Died 10 Feb 2013 (link)
14 Saudi Arabia 69M Hosp 10 Feb 2013 Died 19 Feb 2013 No contact with other confirmed cases; no history of travel (link)
15 Saudi Arabia 39M 24 Feb 2013 Died 2 Mar 2013 No contact with previously confirmed cases, but 51yo brother was a suspected (fatal) case (link)
16 Saudi Arabia 40M 2 Mar 2013 Recovered Brother of case #15; mild illness (link); additional case details here
17 UAE/Germany 73M 19 Mar 2013 Died 26 Mar 2013 Patient had exposure to racing camels; was transferred from Abu Dhabi to Munich (link and link)
18 Saudi Arabia 59M 14 Apr 2013 Died 19 Apr 2013 Reported in Al Ahsa; multiple comorbidities (link)
19 Saudi Arabia 24M 17 Apr 2013 Died 30 May 2013 Reported in Al Ahsa; multiple comorbidities (link)
20 Saudi Arabia 87M 17 Apr 2013 Died 28 Apr 2013 Reported in Al Ahsa; multiple comorbidities (link)
21 Saudi Arabia 58M 22 Apr 2013 In critical but stable condition Reported in Al Ahsa; multiple comorbidities (link)
22 Saudi Arabia 94M 22 Apr 2013 Died 26 Apr 2013 Reported in Al Ahsa; multiple comorbidities (link)
23 Saudi Arabia 56M 22 Apr 2013 Died 30 Apr 2013 Reported in Al Ahsa; multiple comorbidities (link)
24 Saudi Arabia 56M 22 Apr 2013 Died 30 Apr 2013 Reported in Al Ahsa; multiple comorbidities (link)
25 Saudi Arabia 53F 27 Apr 2013 Died 5 Jul 2013 Reported in Al Ahsa; comorbidities (link and link)
26 Saudi Arabia 50M 30 Apr 2013 Recovering Reported in Al Ahsa; comorbidity (link)
27 Saudi Arabia 33M 28 Apr 2013 Recovering Reported in Al Ahsa; family contact of a deceased patient (link)
28 Saudi Arabia 62F 19 Apr 2013 Died 3 May 2013 Reported in Al Ahsa (link)
29 Saudi Arabia 71M 15 Apr 2013 Died 3 May 2013 Reported in Al Ahsa (link)
30 Saudi Arabia 58F 1 May 2013 Died 6 May 2013 Reported in Al Ahsa (link)
31 France 65M 23 Apr 2013 Died 28 May 2013 Visited Dubai UAE April 9-17
32 Saudi Arabia 48M 29 Apr 2013 In stable condition Linked to an outbreak in a health care facility in Al Ahsa (link)
33 Saudi Arabia 58M 6 Apr 2013 Recovered Linked to an outbreak in a health care facility in Al Ahsa; discharged 3 May (link)
34 France 51M N/R In critical condition Shared a hospital room with case #31 from April 27-29 (link)
35 Saudi Arabia 69F 25 Apr 2013 Died (bef 14 May) Linked to an outbreak in a health care facility in Al Ahsa (link)
36 Saudi Arabia 48M 24 Apr 2013 Died 11(?) Jun 2013 Linked to an outbreak in a health care facility in Al Ahsa (link); death reported June 11 (link)
37 Saudi Arabia 81M 26 Apr 2013 Died 22 Jun 2013 Linked to an outbreak in a health care facility in Al Ahsa (link and link)
38 Saudi Arabia 56M 7 May 2013 Recovered Linked to an outbreak in a health care facility in Al Ahsa; discharged prior to 15 May (link)
39 Saudi Arabia 45M 2 May 2013 In critical condition Healthcare worker who was exposed to patients with confirmed nCoV (link)
40 Saudi Arabia 43F 8 May 2013 Recovered Healthcare worker who was exposed to patients with confirmed nCoV (link); discharged 20 May (link)
41 Saudi Arabia 81F 28 Apr 2013 Died 26 May 2013 Patient has multiple coexisting medical conditions; was at the same healthcare facility in Al Ahsa from Apr 8-28 where numerous other nCoV cases have been found (link)
42 Tunisia 35F Rep 20 May 2013 Recovered Daughter of suspected Tunisian case (see below), sister of Case #43; is reported to have accompanied her father for at least part of his trip to Saudi Arabia and Qatar
43 Tunisia 34M Rep 20 May 2013 Recovered Son of suspected Tunisian case (see below), brother of Case #42
44 Saudi Arabia 63M 15 May 2013 Died 20 May 2013 Patient was a Syrian national living in Buraidah in the Al-Qaseem region in the Central part of the country; had an underlying medical condition
45 Saudi Arabia 56M 12 May 2013 Died 20 May 2013 From the Eastern region, but not from Al-Ahsa; had underlying medical conditions which required multiple hospital visits (link)
46 Saudi Arabia 85F 17 May 2013 In critical condition From the Eastern region, but not from Al-Ahsa; had underlying medical conditions which required multiple hospital visits (link)
47 Saudi Arabia 76F 24 May 2013 Recovered From the Eastern region, but not from Al-Ahsa; had underlying medical conditions which required multiple hospital visits; discharged May 27 (link)
48 Saudi Arabia 77M 19 May 2013 Died 26 May 2013 From the Eastern region, but not from Al-Ahsa; had underlying medical conditions which required multiple hospital visits (link)
49 Saudi Arabia 73M 18 May 2013 Died 26 May 2013 From the Eastern region, but not from Al-Ahsa; had underlying medical conditions which required multiple hospital visits (link)
50 Saudi Arabia 61M Rep 29 May 2013 Recovered From Al-Ahsa; patient has chronic renal failure and other chronic diseases (link and link)
51 Italy 45M 25 May 2013 Recovered Patient developed symptoms after spending 40 days in Jordan; family member of Case #52 (link); discharged June 7
52* (P12) Italy 2F Rep 1 Jun 2013 Recovered Niece or grand-child of Case #51 (link); discharged June 5. *Case was re-characterized by WHO from "confirmed" to "probable" on 20 July on the basis of further clarifications of the case definition (link).
53* (P13) Italy 42F Rep 1 Jun 2013 Recovered Work colleague of Case #51 (link); discharged before June 7. *Case was re-characterized by WHO from "confirmed" to "probable" on 20 July on the basis of further clarifications of the case definition (link).
54 Saudi Arabia 83M 27 May 2013 Died 31 May 2013 Patient was from Al-Ahsa and had multiple chronic diseases (link)
55 Saudi Arabia 14F 29 May 2013 In stable condition Patient is from the Eastern region (but not Al-Ahsa), and has underlying medical conditions (link)
56 Saudi Arabia 21M Rep 13 Jun 2013 Died bef 13 Jun 2013 Resident of Hafr Al-Batin (link)
57 Saudi Arabia 63F Rep 13 Jun 2013 Hospitalized Patient is from the Eastern region; has chronic health conditions (link)
58 Saudi Arabia 75M Rep 13 Jun 2013 Died 2 Jul 2013 Patient is from Al-Ahsa; has chronic health conditions (link and link)
59 Saudi Arabia 65M Late May 2013 Died 16 Jun 2013 Saudi citizen from Taif governorate, Mecca province, with chronic medical conditions (link and link).  WHO reports this patient's age as 45 (link).
60 Saudi Arabia 68F 6 Jun 2013 Died 16 Jun 2013 Saudi citizen from Taif governorate, Mecca province, with chronic medical conditions (link and link)
61 Saudi Arabia 46M 29 May 2013 Died 14 Jun 2013 Resident of Wadi Al-Dawaser, Riyadh province (link)
62 Saudi Arabia 42M Rep 16 Jun 2013 Hospitalized Saudi citizen from the Eastern region; patient has chronic asthma (link and link)
63 Saudi Arabia 63F Rep 16 Jun 2013 Died 2 Jul 2013 Saudi citizen from Riyadh; patient has multiple chronic diseases (link, link and link)
64 Saudi Arabia 2M Rep 16 Jun 2013 Died 5 Jul 2013 From Jeddah; patient suffers from a chronic disease of the lungs (link and link)
65 Saudi Arabia 42F Rep 21 Jun 2013 Recovered From the Eastern region (link)
66 Saudi Arabia 45F Rep 21 Jun 2013 Recovered Healthcare worker from Taif (link)
67 Saudi Arabia 39F Rep 21 Jun 2013 Recovered Healthcare worker from Taif (link)
68 Saudi Arabia 29F Rep 21 Jun 2013 Recovered Healthcare worker from Taif (link)
69 Saudi Arabia 41F Rep 22 Jun 2013 Recovered From Riyadh; had contact with a confirmed MERS patient (link and link)
70 Saudi Arabia 32M Rep 22 Jun 2013 Died 23 Jun 2013 Cancer patient in the Eastern region (link)
71 Saudi Arabia 7-15yo Rep 23 Jun 2013 Asymptomatic From Riyadh or Eastern region (link)
72 Saudi Arabia 7-15yo Rep 23 Jun 2013 Asymptomatic From Riyadh or Eastern region (link)
73 Saudi Arabia 7-15yo Rep 23 Jun 2013 Asymptomatic From Riyadh or Eastern region (link)
74 Saudi Arabia 7-15yo Rep 23 Jun 2013 Asymptomatic From Riyadh or Eastern region (link)
75 Saudi Arabia F, age n/r Rep 23 Jun 2013 Asymptomatic Healthcare worker from Eastern region (link)
76 Saudi Arabia F, age n/r Rep 23 Jun 2013 Asymptomatic Healthcare worker from Al-Ahsa  (link)
77 Saudi Arabia 50F Rep 23 Jun 2013 RecoveredFrom the Eastern region; has pre-existing pulmonary disease (link and link)
                   
                   
(P1) Jordan 30M 30 Mar 2012 Recovered 23 Apr 2012 Nurse from the Zarqa healthcare cluster, possibly a direct contact with Case #8; son of Case #P11 & household contact of Case #P6; no history of travel or contact with animals in 10 days prior to symptom onset; identified retrospectively through blood samples (link); WHO lists as "probable"
(P2) Jordan 65M 2 April 2012 Recovered Physician (head of the internal ward) from the Zarq healthcare cluster; not hospitalized; no history of travel or contact with animals in 10 days prior to symptom onset; identified retrospectively through blood samples (link); WHO lists as "probable"
(P3) Jordan 29M 11 Apr 2012 Recovered 21 Apr 2012 Nurse from the Zarqa healthcare cluster; no history of travel or contact with animals in 10 days prior to symptom onset; identified retrospectively through blood samples (link); WHO lists as "probable"
(P4) Jordan 33M 12 Apr 2012 Recovered 21 Apr 2013 Nurse from the Zarqa healthcare cluster; no history of travel or contact with animals in 10 days prior to symptom onset; identified retrospectively through blood samples (link); WHO lists as "probable"
(P5) Jordan 28M 13 Apr 2012 Recovered 21 Apr 2012 Nurse from the Zarqa healthcare cluster; no history of travel or contact with animals in 10 days prior to symptom onset; identified retrospectively through blood samples (link); WHO lists as "probable"
(P6) Jordan 45M 14 Apr 2012 Recovered 24 Apr 2012 Road technician; brother of Case #9 & househodl contact of Case #P1; identified retrospectively through blood samples (link); WHO lists as "probable"
(P7) Jordan 46M 15 Apr 2012 Recovered 21 Apr 2012 Nurse from the Zarqa healthcare cluster; no history of travel or contact with animals in 10 days prior to symptom onset; identified retrospectively through blood samples (link); WHO lists as "probable"
(P8) Jordan 25M 15 Apr 2012 Recovered 21 Apr 2012 Nurse from the Zarqa healthcare cluster; no history of travel or contact with animals in 10 days prior to symptom onset; identified retrospectively through blood samples (link); WHO lists as "probable"
(P9) Jordan 53M 18 Apr 2012 Recovered 23 Apr 2013 Physician from the Zarqa healthcare cluster; no history of travel or contact with animals in 10 days prior to symptom onset; identified retrospectively through blood samples (link); WHO lists as "probable"
(P10) Jordan 28F 19 Apr 2012 Recovered Nurse from the Zarqa healthcare cluster; no history of travel or contact with animals in 10 days prior to symptom onset; not hospitalized; identified retrospectively through blood samples (link); WHO lists as "probable"
(P11) Jordan 60F 26 Apr 2012 Recovered 5 May 2012 Mother of Case #P1; identified retrospectively through blood samples (link); WHO lists as "probable"

June 16, 2013: 2 additional deaths reported in the Eastern region of Saudi Arabia (no details provided) (link).

June 2, 2013: 3 additional deaths reported in Saudi Arabia (no details provided) (link).

May 30, 2013: 3 additional deaths reported in Saudi Arabia, ranging in age from 24 to 60 (Case #19 & 2 unidentified deaths) (link).

May 20, 2013:  The first nCoV case in Tunisia (66M, deceased) was announced by the MoH, but the case could not be confirmed because of sampling issues.  This patient was the father of cases 42 & 43. Patient was diabetic; he developed symptoms May 3rd and died May 10th at the hospital Fatuma Bourguiba in Monastir, after a trip to Saudi Arabia and Qatar.

May 20, 2013: Saudi Arabia MoH announced 1 death of a previously-confirmed patient (male), but did not identify the patient.  One other patient (a healthcare worker) was discharged. link)

Suspected case in family cluster (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia): One additional family member in this household (cases 3, 4 & 7) also became ill, with symptoms similar to those of the confirmed cases. This person has recovered and tested negative, by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests, for the virus. (11/30).

Healthcare cluster (Zarqa, Jordan): ECDC report from May 4 reports that

an outbreak of a respiratory illness was reported on 19 April 2012 by the Ministry of Health in Jordan in an intensive care unit in a hospital in Zarqa.  Seven nurses and one doctor were among the 11 affected.  One of the nurses died.

Family cluster: Cases 10, 11 & 12 (and a suspected 4th case (male) that recovered before being tested)

Family and healthcare clusters: Cases 18-30, 32-33 and 35-38 were all either treated at the same hospital (or a few common hospitals) or were family members of patients who were treated at these hospitals. The hospital-based cases were reported to have been dialysis patients.  Cases 39 & 40 were healthcare workers who treated nCoV patients.

Healthcare cluster:  Cases 31 & 34 shared a hospital room.  There are 5 other contacts of Case 31 who are symptomatic, 3 of whom tested negative.

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Excellent work!
Your chart is very helpful in keeping the cases straight and up-to-date. Thanks AlohaOR.

Like H5N1, this virus has the potential to go pandemic and to be very deadly, IMO.

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away. --Unknown

     


Thanks for opening this up
Coronavirus has me concerned, and will be monitoring this!

Meteorologist in Florida!?!  Now we're talkin'!!!

CIDRAP: Two Jordan cases in April shift novel coronavirus picture
Nov 30, 2012 (CIDRAP News) - The World Health Organization (WHO) reported today that two cases of novel coronavirus (CoV) infection occurred as part of a cluster of hospital respiratory infections in Jordan back in April. Besides adding one more to the list of affected countries, the announcement signaled that the virus emerged 2 months earlier than previously thought and increased the likelihood that it can spread from person to person.

Also today, the WHO said testing confirmed the virus in a fatal case that was part of a previously noted family cluster of four illnesses in Saudi Arabia. Today's developments increased the overall case count to nine, including five deaths, in three neighboring countries: Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Jordan.

The cases include five, with three deaths, in Saudi Arabia; two in Qatar; and the two fatal illnesses in Jordan. The latest count is two more than reported yesterday. Five cases involved acute renal failure.

The Jordanian illness cluster in April involved 11 people, including eight healthcare workers, in a hospital intensive care unit in Zarqa, (Snip). Health officials had mentioned the cluster previously as suspicious in light of the novel coronavirus. Until now, the first novel CoV infection was believed to be that of a Saudi man who died in his home country in June, though his case was not reported until September.

At the time of the Jordanian cluster, officials from US Naval Medical Research Unit 3 (NAMRU 3) in Cairo tested patient samples at Jordan's request and found they were all negative for known coronaviruses and other viruses, the WHO said in one of its two statements today. No specific tests for the novel virus existed at the time, since it hadn't been discovered yet.

In October, after the discovery of the novel CoV, Jordan sent stored samples to NAMRU-3 for testing, the WHO said. Recently the lab provided results that confirmed the novel virus in two of the cases. The WHO did not say how many of the patients were tested. In response to Jordan's request, WHO experts arrived in Amman on Nov 28 to help investigate the cases and strengthen the country's sentinel surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections, (Snip).

The WHO said the existence of the case clusters in Jordan and Saudi Arabia increases "the possibility of limited human-to-human transmission or, alternatively, exposure to a common source. Ongoing investigation may or may not be able to distinguish between these possibilities."

In the Saudi Arabian family cluster, two of the three confirmed cases were fatal. One more family member also had a similar illness and recovered but tested negative by polymerase chain reaction, the WHO noted.

Despite the two clusters, the WHO said, "Based on current information, it [the virus] does not appear to transmit easily between people, unlike the SARS [severe acute respiratory syndrome] virus." The SARS virus, also a coronavirus, sickened about 8,000 people and killed about 900 in 2003.

Saudi Arabia's deputy minister for public health, Ziad A. Memish, MD, today suggested that the virus in the Saudi Arabian family cluster may be different from the strain in the earlier cases. "We think the virus in the last family cluster is different as it had significant spread among households while none of the previous cases behaved in a similar way," (Snip).

The Jordanian cases seem to confirm the need to watch for the novel virus in places beyond just Saudi Arabia and Qatar, as recommended by the WHO lately. Last week the agency called for broader vigilance, and yesterday it offered more detailed surveillance recommendations.

The WHO reiterated those recommendations today. It said authorities should consider testing of patients with unexplained pneumonia, especially if they live in or visited the Arabian peninsula or neighboring countries. Any cluster of severe acute respiratory infections in healthcare workers should be carefully investigated, regardless of the location, the statement said.  

Continued with more information and links: http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidr...  

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away. --Unknown

     


New SARS-like Virus Infects 12 Globally with British Case
http://www.scienceworldreport....

(Cross-posted from Daily News Diary)

The mysterious, potentially deadly, SARS-like virus that is associated with travelling to the Middle East has now been officially diagnosed in another patient. It is now the third case to appear in Britain this week, and shows that the virus can be transmitted between people.

The virus is what is known as a novel coronavirus, or NCoV. The new patient was part of a cluster of three from the same family that all contracted the virus after one of them travelled to the Middle East. It's the twelfth case that has been diagnosed globally since the virus first appeared in September 2012. At that time the World Health Organization (WHO) issued an international alert to warn health professionals and the public that a previously unknown virus had infected a Qatari man in Britain who had recently been to Saudi Arabia. (snip)

Two of the patients from the family in Britain have been hospitalized in separate locations and are being cared for in isolation. The newest, third case was mild; the patient is recovering well. However, health officials have asked the patient to self-isolate and limit contact with other people. In addition, they are now following up with other household members to make sure that they too did not contract the virus. (continued)


Third novel coronavirus infection reported in UK family
http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidr...

(Cross-posted from Daily News Diary)

Feb 15, 2013 (CIDRAP News) - A third member of a British family has been infected with a novel coronavirus (CoV) but has had only a mild illness, UK health officials reported today, providing more evidence of person-to-person transmission of the virus and showing that it doesn't always cause severe sickness.

In a statement, the UK Health Protection agency (HPA) said the patient is a UK resident with no recent travel history and "is recovering from a mild respiratory illness and is currently well." The case raises the global total of novel CoV cases to 12, of which 5 have been fatal.

The latest case is in a family in which two other members were recently hospitalized with severe illnesses linked to the novel virus. The first case was announced Feb 11 and the second one Feb 13. The first patient got sick in January while visiting Saudi Arabia, following a visit to Pakistan; the second patient had no recent travel history.

The HPA did not list the age or gender of the third patient in the family. The other two sick family members are both men. The first patient, a 60-year-old, was co-infected with the novel CoV and the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus, while the second patient has an underlying medical condition, previous reports said. [snip]

"Although this case appears to be due to person-to-person transmission, the risk of infection in contacts in most circumstances is still considered to be low," Watson said. "If novel coronavirus were more infectious, we would have expected to have seen a larger number of cases than we have seen since the first case was reported three months ago." [snip]

The UK family cluster is apparently the third cluster of novel CoV infections so far. Three of the Saudi cases were in one family, and the two Jordanian deaths were part of a cluster in a hospital intensive care unit. (continued)


WHO Update Feb 16 2013
http://www.who.int/csr/don/201...

(No new information beyond the prior 2 news stories)


Experts: New SARS-like virus could show up in U.S.
http://www.cnn.com/2013/02/18/...

"(CNN) -- Infectious disease experts say they wouldn't be surprised if a new virus that's sickened 12 people and killed five shows up in the United States.
The first cases of the novel coronavirus, which is in the same family as SARS and the common cold, were found to have occurred in an Amman, Jordan, hospital in April, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention."

There's more...


Correct me if I'm wrong
The possibilities are:-

1) The thing is quite transmissible, there are many more cases out there but they're not severe, so haven't been observed.

2) similar to 1) but they have been observed and hushed up either locally or individually.

Since it's not known if the source is Saudi or another country, the reasons for a cover up could vary. If it's one of those countries that maids come from, the victims may be keeping it quiet because they don't want to jeopardise their work. And/or may not know they have something new. If it's Saudi, they may not be keen to advertise the disease, even though the Hajj is over.

3) The cases of H2H recorded are some of the first and the fatality is very high (upwards of 60% because the two on ECMO wouldn't survive if there were higher numbers needing the machines).

4) If the cases are so few and far between and it looks like at least one, probably two and possibly three unconnected H2H outbreaks, this bug really wants to go H2H and it's only a matter of time before it sustains it. What the CFR would be at that point is unknown.

They REALLY need to pin down where this thing is coming from.


UK cases
http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/ho...

Khalid Hussain, 38 - other condition cancer
Other family member male


Thank you, UK-Bird
I updated the table & notes.

[ Parent ]
Conflicting info on mild UK case
http://www.npr.org/blogs/healt...

[snip]

The small U.K. cluster started when a British man caught the virus on his way home from Pakistan. "He had spent a fair bit of time in Pakistan, and then traveled through Saudi Arabia," Dr. Gwen Stevens, from the Saudi Arabia Ministry of Health, said at the meeting. "He was sick on the plane."

None of the other passengers caught the illness, Bermingham tells Shots. But when the the man got back to England, he passed the virus along to his 39-year-old son and a 30-year-old woman in the same family.

Bermingham said the son, who died last week, had cancer and a weakened immune system. But the woman was healthy when she got infected and recovered without seeing a doctor. "She thought it was a seasonal flu," Bermingham says. "She didn't want to see anyone about it."

[snip]

She thinks there's an another animal that passes the virus from bats to people. But what that could be is a mystery. One patient from Qatar owns a farm with sheep and camels. "He did go to his farm before he got sick, but he didn't leave his car," Bermingham tells Shots.

The Saudi Arabian health ministry's Stevens says another puzzle is why so few women have been infected. Of the 13 known cases, 11 of them have been men - and the one mild case was woman.

Back in November, the virus infected three men in a large Saudi Arabian family, but never spread to the women and children, Stevens said at the meeting. "The women taking care of the men that were infected never got ill. They were face to face with patients every day but never fell ill."


[ Parent ]
ECDC report on cases
http://www.ecdc.europa.eu/en/p...

see page 4 for case info agrees that mild case is female.


[ Parent ]
Thanks, UK-Bird
I corrected the table.

[ Parent ]
WHO confirms 15th case of SARS-like virus in Saudi Arabia
http://www.torontosun.com/2013...

A Saudi man infected with a deadly new virus from the same family as SARS has died, becoming the ninth patient in the world to be killed from the disease which has so far infected 15, the World Health Organisation said on Tuesday.

The 39-year-old developed symptoms of the novel coronavirus (NCoV) on Feb. 24 and died on March 2, several days after being hospitalised, the WHO said in a disease outbreak update

cont.



Another man.
Are men more likely to catch this or get seriously ill? Is there something they're doing that doesn't involve women?

This is now a fairly steady stream of deaths. Worrying.


[ Parent ]
Some possibilities
(At least with respect to the cases in Saudi Arabia)

There are many restrictions on women traveling in Saudi Arabia.  They must be accompanied by a male guardian, they cannot drive, and they are discouraged from taking public transit.  This means that they may be less likely to be exposed to the infectious agent.

There is little social mingling of the sexes except within the home (among related people).  If men are engaging in activities that tend to expose them to the infectious agent, they are likely to only infect women in their household, but may infect other men in social/business settings.

In some parts of the country (including Riyadh), it is very common for women to be fully veiled, meaning that their faces are covered by cloth (other than their eyes), so there is at least a minimal barrier for respiratory transmission.


[ Parent ]
Thanks AlohaOR.
I'd forgotten about the veil thing in particular.

[ Parent ]
WHO update - 2 nCoV deaths
http://www.who.int/csr/don/201...

26 March 2013 - The Robert Koch Institute informed WHO of a new confirmed case of infection with the novel coronavirus (nCoV).

The patient was a 73-year-old male from United Arab Emirates, who was transferred from a hospital in Abu Dhabi to Munich by air ambulance on 19 March 2013. He died on 26 March 2013.

In the United Kingdom, the index patient in the family cluster reported on 11 February 2013 with travel history to Pakistan and Saudi Arabia prior to his illness, has died.

To date, WHO has been informed of a global total of 17 confirmed cases of human infection with nCoV, including 11 deaths. (continued)


Saudi Arabia: Pro-Med posting on nCoV cases
http://www.promedmail.org/dire...

Case 1: 59 y.o. male with multiple comorbidities. Date of onset of symptoms [14 Apr 2013] and passed away [19 Apr 2013].

Case2: 24 y.o. male with multiple comorbidities. Date of symptoms [17 Apr 2013] and still in ICU in critical but stable condition.

Case 3: 87 y.o. male with multiple comorbidities. Date of symptoms [17 Apr 2013] and passed away [28 Apr 2013].

Case 4: 58 y.o. male with multiple comorbidities. Date of symptoms [22 Apr 2013] still in ICU in stable but critical condition.

Case 5: 94 y.o. male with multiple comorbidities. Date of symptoms [22 Apr 2013] and passed away [26 Apr 2013].

Case 6: 56 y.o. male with multiple comorbidities. Date of Symptoms [22 Apr 2013] and passed away [30 Apr 2013].

Case 7: 56 y.o. male with multiple comorbidities. Date of symptoms [22 Apr 2013] and passed away [29 Apr 2013].

Case 8: 53 y.o. female with comorbidities. Date of symptoms [27 Apr 2013] she is in stable but critical condition

Case 9: 50 y.o. male with comorbidity. Date of symptoms [30 Apr 2013] with pneumonia and he is well on the inpatient ward.

Case 10: 33 y.o. male with comorbidity. Family contact of a deceased patient. Date of symptoms [28 Apr 2013]. Inpatient in the medical ward and doing well.


More info on Tunisian cluster
Novel coronavirus infection - update 22 May 2013
------------------------------------------------
The Ministry of Health in Tunisia has notified WHO of 2 laboratory-confirmed cases and a probable case of infection with the novel coronavirus (nCoV) [MERS-CoV].

The 2 laboratory confirmed cases are a 34-year-old man and a 35-year-old woman. They are siblings. Both of them had mild respiratory illness and did not require hospitalization. Retrospective investigation into the cases revealed that the probable case, their father, 66 years old, became ill 3 days after returning from a visit to Qatar and Saudi Arabia on 3 May 2013. He was admitted to a hospital after developing acute respiratory disease. His condition deteriorated and he died on 10 May 2013. He had an underlying health condition. Initial laboratory tests conducted on the probable case tested negative for nCoV [MERS-CoV].

http://www.promedmail.org/


New Report By AP/FOX News Dated: June 19, 2013
Reported by AP. and FOX News.com

A mysterious new respiratory virus that originated in the Middle East, spreads easily between people and appears more deadly than SARS,[/COLOR][/B] doctors reported Wednesday after investigating the biggest outbreak in Saudi Arabia.

More than 60 cases of what is now called MERS, including 38 deaths, have been recorded by the World Health Organization in the past year, mostly in Saudi Arabia. So far, illnesses haven't spread as quickly as SARS did in 2003, ultimately triggering a global outbreak that killed about 800 people.

In a worrying finding, MERS (Middle East respiratory syndrome) not only spreads easily between people, but within hospitals. That was also the case with SARS, a distant relative of the new virus. "To me, this felt a lot like SARS did," said Dr. Trish Perl, a senior hospital epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins Medicine, who was part of the team.

Their report was published online Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. Perl said they couldn't nail down how it was spread in every case - through droplets from sneezing or coughing, or a more indirect route. Some of the hospital patients weren't close to the infected person, but somehow picked up the virus. "In the right circumstances, the spread could be explosive," said Perl, while emphasizing that the team only had a snapshot of one MERS cluster in Saudi Arabia.

In the Saudi cluster that was investigated, certain patients infected many more people than would be expected, Perl said. One patient who was receiving dialysis treatment spread MERS to seven others, including fellow dialysis patients at the same hospital. During SARS, such patients were known as "superspreaders" and effectively seeded outbreaks in numerous countries. But MERS appears far more lethal. Compared to SARS' 8 percent death rate, the fatality rate for MERS in the Saudi outbreak was about 65 percent, though the experts could be missing mild cases that might skew the figures.  While SARS was traced to bats before jumping to humans via civet cats, the source of the MERS virus remains a mystery.

Doctors around the world have struggled to treat patients. "We need more information from other countries to find out what the best treatment is," said Dr. Clemens Wendtner, who treated a MERS patient who later died in Munich. "Our patient got everything possible and it still didn't help him."

WHO Director-General Dr. Margaret Chan has previously called MERS the single biggest public health threat and acknowledged officials were "empty-handed" regarding prevention measures. "We understand too little about this virus when viewed against the magnitude of its potential threat," she said last month in Geneva.

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