About
About Flu Wiki
How To Navigate
New? Start Here!
Search FW Forum
Forum Rules
Simple HTML I
Simple HTML II
Forum Shorthand
Recent Active Diaries
RSS Feed

Search




Advanced Search


Flu Wiki Forum
Welcome to the conversation Forum of Flu Wiki

This is an international website intended to remain accessible to as many people as possible. The opinions expressed here are those of the individual posters who remain solely responsible for the content of their messages.
The use of good judgement during the discussion of controversial issues would be greatly appreciated.

News Reports for December 3, 2013

by: NewsDiary

Sun Dec 01, 2013 at 16:31:58 PM EST


Reminder: Please do not post whole articles, just snippets and links. Thanks!

Australia
• New South Wales: Christmas egg shortage expected after bird flu outbreak (Link)

China
• Hong Kong on Alert After Woman Catches Bird Flu (Link)
• Hong Kong Gets First Case of Avian Flu Virus (Link)
• Hong Kong confirms fist case of H7N9 bird flu (Link)
• Hong Kong: Three additional overseas cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome closely monitored by DH (Link)
• Hong Kong places 17 people in isolation, scores under watch amid H7N9 bird flu scare (Link)
• Hong Kong gets its first case of deadly H7N9 bird flu (Link)
• Hong Kong sees its first human case of H7N9 bird flu (Link)
• 17 quarantined over Hong Kong bird flu (Link)

Indonesia
• Indonesian Maid in Critical Condition as HK Confirms First Human H7N9 Bird Flu Case (Link)

Netherlands
• CIDRAP: Nearly 10,000 poultry destroyed in H5N3 avian flu outbreak in Netherlands (Link)

United Arab Emirates
• Baby born to Mers victim who died in Abu Dhabi 'not infected' (Link)
• Mers-CoV: Pregnant Woman Dies after Delivery in UAE's First Virus Death (Link)

Research
•  1950s Pandemic Influenza Virus Remains a Health Threat, Particularly to Those Under 50 (Link)

General
• CIDRAP: MERS-CoV: UAE reports cases, Qatar finds infected camels (Link)
• Abu Dhabi, Qatar see further MERS virus deaths (Link)
• Mers virus kills more in Qatar, and infects a family of three in the UAE (Link)

Commentary
• Recombinomics: Hong Kong H7N9 Case(s) Raise Concerns (Link)
• Avian Flu Diary: Hong Kong - Steering Committee Reconvenes On H7N9 (Link)


• H (Link)

NewsDiary :: News Reports for December 3, 2013

News for December 2, 2013 is here.


Thanks to all of the newshounds!
Special thanks to the newshound volunteers who translate international stories - thanks for keeping us all informed!
Other useful links:

WHO H7N9 web page

WHO A(H1N1) Site
WHO H5N1 human case totals
Charts and Graphs on H5N1 from WHO
Google Flu Trends
CDC Weekly Influenza Summary
Map of seasonal influenza in the U.S.
CIDPC (Canada) Weekly FluWatch
UK RCGP Weekly Data on Communicable and Respiratory Diseases
Flu Wiki

Tags: , , (All Tags)
Print Friendly View Send As Email

Hong Kong on Alert After Woman Catches Bird Flu
Indonesian woman in critical condition after apparently being infected with H7N9 strand during visit to Shenzhen

Hong Kong has confirmed its first human case of potentially deadly H7N9 bird flu, and raised its influenza pandemic response level from "alert" to "serious."

A 36-year-old Indonesian domestic worker was hospitalized with the virus on Nov. 27 after apparently being in contact with live poultry in the nearby Chinese city of Shenzhen last month, reports the Wall Street Journal. She is currently in a critical condition, and those who had been in close contact with her have also been isolated for further observation.

Continued: http://world.time.com/2013/12/...

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away. --Unknown

     


China: Hong Kong Gets First Case of Avian Flu Virus
Hong Kong health officials raised avian influenza alert levels to serious late Monday after a domestic worker in the city became critically ill with the virus, the first reported case in the territory.

The 36-year-old Indonesian woman may have contracted the deadly virus after traveling across the mainland border to Shenzhen, where she purchased a chicken, slaughtered it and then ate it, health officials said.

(Snip)

But the virus's spread to Hong Kong is alarming given the city's status as an international transportation hub and its history as the epicenter of the SARS epidemic, which quickly spread through the territory in 2003, killing 299 people and leaving 1,800 others extremely ill.

(Snip)

Officials said that four people in the home where the stricken woman worked - the two parents and two children - showed possible signs of illness and were being monitored at the same hospital.

In raising the virus alert level to "serious," health officials said they would tighten infection controls at hospitals and limit visiting hours, while strictly enforcing cleaning rules at live chicken stalls in local markets.

Hong Kong also plans to step up health checks at its borders to screen visitors for the virus as it tries to prevent the spread of H7N9 (Snip). http://sinosphere.blogs.nytime...  

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away. --Unknown

     


China: Hong Kong confirms fist case of H7N9 bird flu
Hong Kong has confirmed its first case of the new strain of the H7N9 bird flu in a domestic worker from Indonesia, BBC News reported. The worker, 36, recently travelled to Shenzhen in the mainland and came into contact with live poultry. She is in critical condition, officials say.

(Snip)

The case in Hong Kong is a sign that the virus may be spreading beyond mainland China, where most infections have been reported, and Taiwan.

The World Health Organization (WHO) had said there was "no evidence of sustained human-to-human transmission", but also described H7N9 as an "unusually dangerous virus".

At least 139 human cases of H7N9 have been confirmed, including 45 deaths, WHO says in a statement dated 6 November. At least one case was confirmed in Taiwan in April.

Dr Ko Wing-man, Hong Kong's food and health secretary, confirmed the territory's first H7N9 case late on Monday. (Snip) "She is now in critical condition at Queen Mary Hospital," he said, adding that four people in close contact with her were showing signs of flu-like symptoms.

Hong Kong is now on public health alert and has suspended the import of live chickens from some farms across the border with the mainland.

(Snip)

"There is no indication thus far that it can be transmitted between people, but both animal-to-human and human-to-human routes of transmission are being actively investigated," the organisation adds. http://www.panarmenian.net/eng...

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away. --Unknown

     


HongKong:more info from the Steering Committee on Serious Response Level
Hat tip: http://afludiary.blogspot.com/

A second press release from the HK authorities
http://www.info.gov.hk/gia/gen...
[lots of info at link, including this snip:]
The patient is in critical condition at the Intensive Care Unit of Queen Mary Hospital. The CHP has so far successfully contacted over 200 persons who had contacts with the patient, including 17 persons with close contacts.  Of which, 10 home contacts of the patient were tested negative for the H7N9 virus after rapid test at this stage. Close contacts without any symptoms will be arranged to stay in non-hospitalised quarantine facilities. It is expected that five close contacts without any symptoms will be sent to Lady MacLehose Holiday Village of the LCSD in Sai Kung for quarantine tonight.

[more at link]

[And further down AF Diary a good explanation of how they isolate suspected patients and a bit more info:]

http://afludiary.blogspot.com/...

The patient's traveling companion has now been located (see Video: HK Officials Seeking Traveling Companion Of H7N9 Patient), has tested negative, and remains asymptomatic.

At this point more than 200 people with potential exposure have been offered Tamiflu ® prophylaxis, most of whom are medical staff or hospital employees (see H7N9: CDC Guidance On Antiviral Chemoprophylaxis  for additional background).

The CHP is undertaking a massive public awareness campaign on H7N9 prevention.

[comment - seems to be happening fast and furiously at this point!]


[ Parent ]
Australia: Christmas egg shortage expected after bird flu outbreak (New South Wales)
Australia is facing an egg shortage ahead of the peak holiday season after an outbreak of bird flu shut down two poultry farms.

About 450,000 chickens have been destroyed at a free range and caged egg farm in Young, NSW, creating a national shortfall, which will cause prices to rise and take six to 12 months to abate.

The virus is not the highly pathogenic H5N1 strain, which has killed humans, nor is it closely related, the NSW Department of Primary Industries said. But it has significantly dented supply and put pressure on prices.

Melbourne-based Farm Pride Foods, which is one of Australia's biggest egg processors, has had to cancel orders, with its sales plunging between 8 and 9 per cent compared with the same time last year.

NSW Farmers Association Egg Committee chair Bede Burke said demand for eggs normally doubled in the week before Christmas ''but this year the eggs won't be there''.

(Big Snip)

It is understood the virus originated at the property's free range farm and soon spread to its neighbouring caged farm. Continued: http://www.watoday.com.au/busi...  

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away. --Unknown

     


Hong Kong H7N9 Case(s) Raise Concerns
Recombinomics Commentary

The 36-year-old patient is in a critical condition in Queen Mary Hospital, Pok Fu Lam, with severe pneumonia and breathing with the help of an artificial lung.

The live-in helper works for a couple with two children, and all four were said to have minor flu symptoms and were under observation in quarantine at Princess Margaret Hospital.

Health officials are looking for a second person who accompanied the helper to Shenzhen on November 17.

The helper developed flu symptoms four days later. She was first treated at Tuen Mun Hospital, but was transferred to Queen Mary last Wednesday.

Ko said two earlier tests for the virus came back negative, but a third test last night confirmed she had contracted H7N9.

The above comments describe the first confirmed H7N9 bird flu case (36F) in Hong Kong.  The live-in helper had traveled to Shenzhen (Snip) to buy a chicken.  She developed flu symptoms, but tested negative twice.  However, after her condition worsened (including breathing difficulties) she was hospitalized and tested positive for H7N9.

The case raised concerns since she tested negative twice and it is unclear if milder cases will be detected.  The four contacts in the home have mild symptoms, while status of the person who also traveled to Shenzhen is currently unknown.

This is the third H7N9 case originating in Huizhou in Guangdong province since August (Snip).  A full set of sequences (Snip) was released for the first case (51F).  Although the external gene segments (H7, N9, MP) and NP were  closely related to the cases from the spring (largely centered around Shanghai), the internal gene segments (PB2, PB1, PA, NS) were most closely related to H9N2 sequences found in southern China (largely Hong Kong).

Sequences from a more recent case (3M), which was also from Guangdong Province (Dongguan) have not been released.  However, the Hong Kong case also traveled to Guangdong Province (Shenzhen) raising the possibility that all three cases have a similar constellation of genes which is distinct from the sequences from northern China.

The second case was also linked to symptomatic family members, but they tested negative for H7N9.  The initial negative tests for the current case raise concerns that mild H7N9 cases, including contacts, will also test negative. http://www.recombinomics.com/N...

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away. --Unknown

     


CIDRAP: MERS-CoV: UAE reports cases, Qatar finds infected camels
The United Arab Emirates (UAE) yesterday reported three Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) cases in one young family, including a pregnant woman. That report came 4 days after Qatari officials revealed that the virus was found in three camels with links to two human case-patients.

The World Health Organization (WHO) said today that the UAE cases involved a 38-year-old man, a 32-year-old woman, and their 8-year-old son. Media reports said the three were from Jordan, but the WHO statement did not list their nationality. A report today in the UAE newspaper The National said the mother has died of her illness.

The report from Qatar marks the second time the virus has been found in camels, the previous instance having been reported by Saudi Arabia about 3 weeks ago. But scientists have not yet found conclusive evidence that camels are a source of human infections.

UAE family cluster
The earliest onset of illness in the UAE cases was Nov 15, the WHO said. The parents were in critical condition yesterday, while their son had mild respiratory symptoms. The mother gave birth to a child while she was hospitalized for treatment, the agency said.

The three patients had no recent travel history, no contact with other known case-patients, and no recent contact with animals, the agency said.

The 8-year-old's infection was found through an epidemiologic investigation of the parents' contacts, and he is isolated in a hospital. Further investigations of the family's close contacts, the newborn baby, and healthcare workers are continuing, the WHO said.

The death of the 32-year-old mother was reported today by the Health Authority Abu Dhabi, according to The National. The story gave no other new details.

The WHO in today's statement also reported that two other Qatari MERS patients, whose cases were announced earlier, died on Nov 19 and 29, but it gave no details about the patients. A media report on Nov 19 had noted the MERS-CoV-related death of a 61-year-old man who was a foreign visitor in Qatar.

The WHO's MERS-CoV count now stands at 163 confirmed cases and 70 deaths.

Infected camels
Qatari officials reported the infected camels in a statement dated Nov 27, and the WHO followed up with its own statement Nov 29.

The WHO said the camel infections were found during the investigations of two human cases in Qatar, both in October. One involved a 61-year-old man who owns a farm and had significant contact with camels, sheep, and hens. The other case involved a 23-year-old man who worked in the other patient's barn. Qatar's Supreme Council of Health (SCH) said both of those patients recovered.

The WHO said the three infected camels were among a herd of 14 that were tested in the investigation of the human cases. All the camels seemed healthy or showed only mild signs of illness when samples were collected for MERS-CoV testing, and their status didn't change during their ensuing 40 days in isolation, the agency said.

Dutch scientists who helped with the investigation detected MERS-CoV RNA in nose swabs from the three camels tested, and they confirmed the result by sequencing a fragment of the virus, according to a Nov 29 ScienceInsider report. All contacts of the two patients, along with another worker in the barn, tested negative for the virus, the WHO reported. (Snip).

"These results demonstrate that camels can be infected with MERS-CoV but there is insufficient information to indicate the role camels and other animals may be playing in the possible transmission of the virus, including to and from humans," the WHO said.

Continued with lots more: http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news...  

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away. --Unknown

     


CIDRAP: Nearly 10,000 poultry destroyed in H5N3 avian flu outbreak in Netherlands
An outbreak of low-pathogenic H5N3 avian influenza that has resulted in the culling of 9,301 poultry was reported to the International Organization for Animal Health (OIE) today from Sint Annen in the Dutch province of Groningen.

The outbreak, which infected 25 birds, none fatally, began on Nov 27. The last H5N3 outbreak in the area was reported in May. The affected birds in the current outbreak had subclinical infection; their disease was confirmed by basic laboratory tests. All of the birds considered susceptible were killed. Continued: http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news...

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away. --Unknown

     


China: Three additional overseas cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome closely monitored by DH (Hong Kong)
The Department of Health (DH) is today (December 3) closely monitoring three additional cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) by the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

According to the WHO, the three patients belong to a family in the UAE capital, including a woman aged 32, a man aged 38 and their son aged eight. The earliest onset of symptoms was November 15. The couple are both in critical condition in hospital.

They have no travel history or contact with animals or confirmed patients. Their son, with mild respiratory symptoms, was detected after epidemiological investigation of family contacts, and is currently in an isolation ward. During hospitalisation, the woman gave birth to a newborn child. Further investigations into the family's close contacts, the newborn baby, and healthcare workers are ongoing.

In addition, two previously confirmed patients from Qatar died on November 19 and 29.

Continued: http://www.chp.gov.hk/en/view_...

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away. --Unknown

     


ndonesian Maid in Critical Condition as HK Confirms First Human H7N9 Bird Flu Case
December 3, 2013

Hong Kong. Hong Kong reported its first case of a form of bird flu that killed 45 people in eastern China, suggesting the virus is spreading further south in poultry.

A 36-year-old Indonesian domestic helper is in critical condition after being infected with the new H7N9 flu strain, Hong Kong's government said yesterday. She had traveled to the neighboring mainland Chinese city of Shenzhen, where she bought and slaughtered a chicken, according to a statement.

Her infection suggests the virus, which is often lethal to humans but causes no symptoms in birds, is circulating less than 30 miles from downtown Hong Kong. The city's government curbed live poultry sales 16 years ago to prevent an earlier bird-flu variant from spreading. Yesterday, it elevated the response level under its influenza pandemic preparedness plan to "serious," requiring hospitals to step up infection controls and limit visiting hours.

"We might not expect that this case is the only infection" in Shenzhen, said Ben Cowling, associate professor of infectious disease epidemiology at the University of Hong Kong's School of Public Health.

Four people who had been in recent, close contact with the patient are displaying minor symptoms, said Ko Wing-man, the city's health secretary, in the statement. Results of diagnostic tests on them and others may be available as early as today.

Chris Cheung, a spokesman for Hong Kong's Department of Health, declined to elaborate on the circumstances around which the patient was probably infected. The patient visited Shenzhen on Nov. 17, according to the statement.

She had a history of "traveling to Shenzhen, buying a chicken, slaughtering the chicken and eating the chicken," Ko told reporters in Hong Kong yesterday.

full article
http://www.thejakartaglobe.com...

United we stand: Divided we fall
www.flunewsnetwork.com


Abu Dhabi, Qatar see further MERS virus deaths
http://www.arabianbusiness.com...

By Andy Sambidge | Tuesday, 3 December 2013 1:46 PM

Health authorities in Abu Dhabi have said that a woman has died from a SARS-like virus that has been centered in neighbouring Saudi Arabia.

The health authority in Abu Dhabi reported the death of the Jordanian woman from Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, on Tuesday.

Her husband and son have also contracted the virus and they are currently in stable condition.
...

"They had no travel history, no contact with a known confirmed case and no history of contact with animals... The 8 year old son, who has mild respiratory symptoms, was detected from epidemiological investigation of family contacts, and is being kept in hospital isolation,"
WHO said in the statement.

In memory of pogge: Peace, order and good government, eh?
[If we want it, we'll have to work at it.]


Mers virus kills more in Qatar, and infects a family of three in the UAE
http://www.scmp.com/news/world...

PUBLISHED : Tuesday, 03 December, 2013, 10:58pm
UPDATED : Tuesday, 03 December, 2013, 10:58pm

Another three people in the United Arab Emirates are sick with the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (Mers) virus and two people infected with it in Qatar have died.

The new cases in UAE involved a family in Abu Dhabi - a mother, father and an eight-year-old boy - the World Health Organisation said in a disease outbreak update. The parents are both in a critical condition in hospital, while the boy has mild respiratory symptoms.

The WHO said the mother gave birth while in hospital, adding the baby, other close family contacts and hospital staff were being monitored and tested for signs of the virus.

...

In memory of pogge: Peace, order and good government, eh?
[If we want it, we'll have to work at it.]


Baby born to Mers victim who died in Abu Dhabi 'not infected'
http://www.thenational.ae/uae/...

Jennifer Bell
December 3, 2013 Updated: December 3, 2013 20:14:00


The Jordanian boy's mother, 32, who gave birth two weeks ago, has died. His father, 38, is still in hospital.

"All close contacts including healthcare workers, family members, school teachers and students in exposed classes are to be tested for Mers-CoV," said Dr Jamal Al Kaabi, director of customer care and corporate communications at Health Authority Abu Dhabi.

Dr Al Kaabi said he could not reveal at which school the boy is a pupil. He has mild respiratory symptoms and is receiving the appropriate care.

The boy's mother had been in a critical condition and was admitted to hospital on November 22, when she was 32 weeks pregnant.

Dr Al Kaabi confirmed the newborn, a girl who was delivered by caesarean, was not infected.

The mother is believed to have been the first pregnant woman to have contracted the virus.

His father was admitted to an intensive care unit after complaining of respiratory symptoms and was found to have the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, which kills about half of those infected.

The boy and his father are both in a stable condition.

The World Health Organisation has confirmed that, unlike many other Mers cases, the mother, father and son had no history of travel, no contact with a known confirmed case and no history of contact with animals.

The boy's condition was diagnosed as Mers-CoV during medical check-ups of family members and he was admitted to hospital on Sunday.

...

In memory of pogge: Peace, order and good government, eh?
[If we want it, we'll have to work at it.]


Mers-CoV: Pregnant Woman Dies after Delivery in UAE's First Virus Death
http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/artic...

By Hannah Osborne : Subscribe to Hannah's RSS feed | December 03, 2013 11:20 AM GMT

Woman with Mers-Cov in critical condition after giving birth (Reuters)

A woman in Abu Dhabi has died after giving birth to a baby by caesarean section after being diagnosed with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (Mers-CoV).

The World Health Organisation confirmed three additional cases of the virus in the United Arab Emirates - the woman's husband and eight-year-old son were also diagnosed with the disease.

The woman, 32, became the first person to die from Mers-CoV in the UAE.

Their eight-year-old son had mild symptoms and is being kept in isolation in hospital, while the baby is being cared for and is believed to be doing well.

None of the family members have travel history, contact with a known confirmed case or any contact with animals. Further investigations into close contacts of the family are ongoing.
...

In memory of pogge: Peace, order and good government, eh?
[If we want it, we'll have to work at it.]


Hong Kong places 17 people in isolation, scores under watch amid H7N9 bird flu scare
http://www.scmp.com/news/hong-...

[Hong Kong takes no chances with infectious disease. Many interesting details have been cut from this article. Read at site.]

Photo caption:
Hygiene workers sterilise areas of the Palatial Coast estate in Tuen Mun, where infected domestic worker Tri Mawarti lived.
Photo: Sam Tsang

More than 200 people have been placed under observation after coming into contact with an Indonesian domestic helper who is the first person in Hong Kong to be infected with the fatal H7N9 strain of bird flu.

Seventeen of them, who either lived in the same Tuen Mun flat as the patient, or were in the same cubicle as her when she was treated in Tuen Mun Hospital, were most at risk of infection and had been isolated, the Centre for Health Protection said.

There is so far no evidence to show the virus has spread to another person. According to the assessments of the World Health Organisation and Centre for Health Protection, the risk of locals contracting H7N9 has not increased or changed

The Indonesian consulate confirmed the patient was 35-year-old Tri Mawarti.

[big snip of details about people that have been isolated]

Medical experts said that as Tri was confirmed as an infected case only on the third H7N9 test, this suggested a preliminary viral test might not be accurate enough. University of Hong Kong's chair of virology professor Malik Peiris said the virus might not be detectable when the strength was low.

"The avian influenza virus is found deep in the lungs. The patient's first two samples were taken from the upper respiratory tract because she was not so sick at the time. The third time it was taken from her lungs."

His university colleague, Ho Pak-leung, said evidence in four clusters of patients on the mainland suggested the virus could have developed a limited ability to pass from person to person.
...

In memory of pogge: Peace, order and good government, eh?
[If we want it, we'll have to work at it.]


Hong Kong gets its first case of deadly H7N9 bird flu
http://www.newscientist.com/ar...

   17:31 03 December 2013 by Debora MacKenzie

Deadly bird flu is on the march. A 35-year old woman has become the first person in Hong Kong to contract the H7N9 virus, a sign that it is spreading across China.

The woman, a domestic worker, is in a critical condition in
hospital. The family she works for was under quarantine with mild flu symptoms. It is thought that she caught the virus from a chicken that she killed, cooked and ate in Shenzhen, which lies in the neighbouring Guangdong province.

H7N9 spreads "silently" in poultry, which show no symptoms but can transmit the virus to humans. People in very close contact can sometimes pass it to one another.
...

Hong Kong has now stopped importing Shenzhen chickens and is screening people at its border. Shanghai also announced this week that for the next five years it will shut all live markets from February to April, when millions travel to celebrate new year.

In memory of pogge: Peace, order and good government, eh?
[If we want it, we'll have to work at it.]


Hong Kong sees its first human case of H7N9 bird flu
http://www.japantimes.co.jp/ne...

AFP-JIJI  |  Dec 3, 2013

...


Ko said Hong Kong had suspended the import of live poultry from Shenzhen and escalated the grade of its flu contingency plan to "serious," according to the RTHK report.

...

In August, Chinese scientists reported the first likely case of direct person-to-person transmission of H7N9 but stressed that the virus, believed to jump from birds to people, was still not adept at spreading among humans.

...

A report by researchers published in The Lancet medical journal in October said closing live poultry markets, though a huge economic setback, is a sure-fire way of curbing H7N9.



In memory of pogge: Peace, order and good government, eh?
[If we want it, we'll have to work at it.]


17 quarantined over Hong Kong bird flu
http://www.radioaustralia.net....

Posted 4 December 2013, 0:34 AEST

...

"If those who had been in close contact [with the patient] don't have symptoms, we will later arrange for them to enter quarantine facilities," said Hong Kong's Health Minister Ko Wing-man.

"Tonight, five people who were in close contact and do not show signs of infection will enter the quarantine," Mr Ko said, adding that they will be held until 10 days after their last contact with the carrier.

A government statement later said all 17 people had tested negative for the virus, but would be sent to a holiday village in the seaside town of Sai Kung "for medical surveillance".

AFP

In memory of pogge: Peace, order and good government, eh?
[If we want it, we'll have to work at it.]


Research: 1950s Pandemic Influenza Virus Remains a Health Threat, Particularly to Those Under 50

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have evidence that descendants of the H2N2 avian influenza A virus that killed millions worldwide in the 1950s still pose a threat to human health, particularly to those under 50. The research has been published in an advance online edition of the Journal of Virology.

The study included 22 H2N2 avian viruses collected from domestic poultry and wild aquatic birds between 1961 and 2008, making it the most comprehensive analysis yet of avian H2N2 viruses.

Researchers reported the viruses could infect human respiratory cells. Several strains also infected and spread among ferrets, which are susceptible to the same flu viruses as humans. Based on those and other indicators, one virus was classified as posing a high risk for triggering a pandemic.

Researchers found evidence the viruses were susceptible to current antiviral medications and could likely be controlled with an available prototype vaccine.

Such protection was unavailable in 1957 when an H2N2 virus that included genes from avian flu viruses emerged. Federal health officials estimate the 1957-58 pandemic killed 1 to 2 million people worldwide. While the H2N2 strain disappeared from flu viruses circulating in humans in 1968, it has persisted in the world's bird population.

"This study suggests H2N2 has the characteristics necessary to re-emerge as a significant threat to human health in part because most individuals under the age of 50 lack immunity to the virus," said corresponding author Robert Webster, Ph.D., a member of the St. Jude Department of Infectious Diseases. "This highlights the importance of continued surveillance of viruses circulating in animals and additional research to enhance our ability to identify viruses that are emerging health threats."

More: http://www.newsday.com/busines...


Interesting story
Thank you for posting it, Ruby.

[ Parent ]
Please post new news stories ...
Menu

Make a New Account

Username:

Password:



Forget your username or password?



Active Users
Currently 1 user(s) logged on.

Contact
  DemFromCT
  pogge (In Memorium)
  Bronco Bill
  SusanC (emeritus)
  Melanie (In Memoriam)

  Flu Wiki (active wiki resource)
  How To Add To Flu Wiki
  Get Pandemic Ready (How To Start Prepping)
  Citizen's Guide v 2.0
  Effect Measure
  Dude's FTP

Home
Powered by: SoapBlox